A Leadership Lesson From Harold Camping’s Failed Rapture Prediction

Image by CarzyInSane

One of the most interesting quotes that I’ve read coming out of the failed prediction/calculation of Harold Camping that Judgment Day would by May 21, 2011 came from the USA Today. Dennis Cauchon writes:

Some Family Radio staff members said last week that most employees planned to be at work today and that most workers were skeptical about the doomsday prediction.

What does it say about a leader when the people closest to him, at least in physical proximity, didn’t even believe him?

What could have happened if these staff members would have spoken up? How could have the lives of the hundreds(?) of people who gave away their life savings, quit their jobs, and will likely emerge from this fiasco with their faith tarnished been kept from being negatively impacted?

Thoughts?

I Love Being a Dad

Before Brea and I had our first child, I was kind of worried about how having kids would change me. Three years later, I love every minute of it. Well, maybe I didn’t love getting puked on at Mimi’s Cafe or kissing puke on Lilyana’s face when I couldn’t see in the dark of the middle of the night, but I’ll take those few low moments in exchange for the absolute joy that these girls bring into my heart every day.

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Pace of Life

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There are some days that I wonder what our culture is doing to us. The other day was one of those days.

I was having lunch with a man from my church. He has four kids, three of which are teenagers. None of them are involved in a ridiculous amount of extra-curricular activities, but their lives are still chaotic. They’re involved in a sport that requires early mornings, extensive travel, and a large chunk of time. Their story is not unique, nor is the sport that takes up a HUGE chunk of their time.

The unfortunate byproduct of their lives the way they are now is that they have very little margin left. Almost of their time is devoted to going. Going to and from school, sports, work, internships, jobs, and . . . church.

One of the things that I love about this family is that they are devoted to their faith and the church. It’s rare that they miss a Sunday. But because of the pace of life that has been thrust upon them they’re not able to connect with others in the church at the level they want and need. And since they can’t connect the pace of life takes a harder toll on them and creates more stress. It’s a vicious cycle.

They seem to be victims of our culture’s crazy pace of life. They’re busy living life, but don’t feel fully alive.

Where do you see this happening in your life? I the lives of those around you? Is there anything that we can do to combat this?

Image by flickr user Éole

The Power of Less

The USDA today released a shocking recommendation on how to lose weight: eat less. Stop the presses. Why didn’t anyone tell me this before? I wonder how many millions or billions of dollars of research went into that hidden jewel of knowledge that only our government could have discovered?

In somewhat related news, this week Brea and I are fasting from television. We started Sunday and won’t watch anything until the Super Bowl.
We’ve both been watching way too much TV recently, which has been distracting us from spending time reading, studying the Bible, and doing other non-TV type things. We want to spend less time on unimportant things to devote more time to what’s really important.

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